A bloodhound

I quit smoking (again). Yay me! Good job and kudos to my will power and resolve.

I thought my life would be all fine and dandy with improved lung capacity and a renewed sense of taste. But I forgot about a very important benefit that comes from smoking: it greatly inhibits your sense of smell. No, I’m not being ironical. When you live the city life, a powerful sense of smell┬ácan be construed as nothing other than a terrible curse.

Now that my olfactory perception is of superhero status, I feel like a freaking bloodhound.

Bloodhound on Scent

Every smell, no matter how faint, totally overwhelms me. From the ripe body odour and reek of unwashed hair from my fellow bus riders, to my boyfriend’s bad breath, to cigarette smoke, to rotting garbage, to urine, to mouldy old food. Every single ┬áscent so pungent it is completely nauseating.

Why can’t I live in the countryside where warm breezes bring the scent of wildflowers and hay? Or sunshine and dust? Or rain and the smell of plants softly growing?

Nope. I live in a city full of sewage, trash, and sweat. At least it’s winter so the odours are constantly being washed away by the rain.

On the plus side, this new irritation means I am crazy motivated to clean (even more so). And now the dirty laundry has zero chance to pile up.

On the down side, I feel like barfing all the time and I am going through my perfume and febreeze like no tomorrow. I use so much of the stuff it’s starting to make my throat sore.

I guess it’s a small price to pay for that whole avoiding cancer of the pulmonary system thingy.

Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

captain nose hero!

I wonder what my next newly discovered superhero power will be?

 

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5 Responses to A bloodhound

  1. Kate says:

    Proud of you for making another go at it, sis. It’s always interesting to see what scents individuals are particularly susceptible to, but it sounds like you’re getting the jumbo assortment pack at the moment. Perhaps it’s time to plan an olfactory adventure?

  2. Mary says:

    Wherever did you find the Captain Nose graphic? Perfect!

    Congratulations on quitting! Allow me to offer a cure for smelly cities: the lyrics to “A Song of Old Hawaii”:

    “There’s a perfume of a million flowers, clinging to the heart of old Hawaii.
    There’s a rainbow following the showers, bringing me a part of old Hawaii.
    There’s a silvery moon, a symphony of stars,
    There’s a hula tune and the hum of soft guitars.
    There’s the trade wind, sighing in the heavens, singing me a song of old Hawaii.”

    The answer!

  3. Susan says:

    Didn’t know you’d gone back to smoking, so congrats on quitting. Like you, I quit many times. The final time was the winner, because a switch flipped in my head to “You look like a pathetic loser when you’re smoking.” Not the self-image I wanted!

    Maybe you’ll eventually get hardened to the smells, but at least recommend flossing or mouthwash to your boyfriend. OR – I have a friend who is extremely sensitive to perfumes, etc, and she actually carries a gas mask for situations she can’t easily escape from. If you don’t mind looking like a giant alien bug, I guess you could do that.

  4. Lynn Bee says:

    Oh! That song is amazing! Thanks Mary. Please bottle some Hawaii nei and mail it over. Thanks!

  5. Lynn Bee says:

    An adventure? I am suspicious. What did you have in mind, Kate?

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